misdiagnosis type 2 diabetes

🔥+ misdiagnosis type 2 diabetes 10 Jul 2020 It's the most common form of diabetes. Type 2 means that your body doesn't use insulin properly. And while some people can control their blood sugar levels with ...

misdiagnosis type 2 diabetes Type 1 diabetes was defined as at least 1 positive antibody result, regardless of insulin sensitivity, or no positive antibody results and insulin ...

13 symptoms of diabetic coma
Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options Skip directly to A-Z link
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC twenty four seven. Saving Lives, Protecting People Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC twenty four seven. Saving the 1 last update 10 Jul 2020 Lives, Protecting PeopleCenters for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC twenty four seven. Saving Lives, Protecting People
×
For a full list of topics: A-Z Index
Tips From Former Smokers ®
Español (Spanish)
Minus
Related Pages

misdiagnosis type 2 diabetes lifestyle changes (🔥 vaccine) | misdiagnosis type 2 diabetes young adultshow to misdiagnosis type 2 diabetes for What Is Diabetes?

Diabetes is a group of diseases in which blood sugar levels are higher than normal. Most of the food a person eats is turned into glucose (a kind of sugar) for the body’s cells to use for energy. The pancreas, an organ near the stomach, makes a hormone called insulin that helps glucose get into the body’s cells. When you have diabetes, your body either doesn’t make enough insulin or can’t use the insulin very well. Less glucose gets into the cells and instead builds up in the blood.1 There are different types of diabetes. Type 2 is the most common in adults and accounts for more than 90% of all diabetes cases. Fewer people have type 1 diabetes, which most often develops in children, adolescents, or young adults.2

 Top of Page

How Is Smoking Related to Diabetes?

misdiagnosis type 2 diabetes mellitus nature reviews (☑ doctor near me) | misdiagnosis type 2 diabetes mellitus icd 10how to misdiagnosis type 2 diabetes for We now know that smoking causes type 2 diabetes. In fact, smokers are 30–40% more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than nonsmokers. And people with diabetes who smoke are more likely than nonsmokers to have trouble with insulin dosing and with controlling their disease.3 The more cigarettes you smoke, the higher your risk for type 2 diabetes.3 No matter what type of diabetes you have, smoking makes your diabetes harder to control. If you have diabetes and you smoke, you are more likely to have serious health problems from diabetes. Smokers with diabetes have higher risks for serious complications, including:4

  • Heart and kidney disease
  • Poor blood flow in the legs and feet that can lead to infections, ulcers, and possible amputation (removal of a body part by surgery, such as toes or feet)
  • Retinopathy (an eye disease that can cause blindness)
  • Peripheral neuropathy (damaged nerves to the arms and legs that causes numbness, pain, weakness, and poor coordination)

If you are a smoker with diabetes, quitting smoking will benefit your health right away. People with diabetes who quit have better control of their blood sugar levels.5 For free help to quit, call 1-800-QUIT NOW (1-800-784-8669) or visit CDC.gov/tips. Spanish-speakers can call 1-855-DÉJELO-YA (1-855-335-3569) or visit CDC.gov/consejos.

 Top the 1 last update 10 Jul 2020 of Page Top of Page

How Can Diabetes Be Prevented?

Don’t smoke. Smoking increases your chance of having type 2 diabetes.4 Lose weight if you are overweight or obese.6 Stay active. Physical activity can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes in adults who are at high risk for the disease.6

 Top of Page Top of Page

How Is Diabetes Treated?

misdiagnosis type 2 diabetes urination (⭐️ management) | misdiagnosis type 2 diabetes younghow to misdiagnosis type 2 diabetes for Diabetes treatment and management can include:7

  • A healthy diet and physical activity program
  • Weight loss (if overweight or obese)
  • Medicines to control blood sugar by helping the body use insulin better
  • Insulin taken by injections or by using an insulin pump
  • Patient education to address problem-solving and coping skills needed to help manage diabetes and its complications
  • Medicines to control cholesterol and blood pressure

 Top of Page

References

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Basics About Diabetes [last updated 2017 Jul 20; accessed 2018 Mar 22].
  2. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Diabetes Overview [last updated 2014 Apr 2; accessed 2014 May 5].
  3. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014 [accessed 2018 Mar 22].
  4. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. A Report of the Surgeon General. How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease: What It Means to You. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2010 [accessed 2018 Mar 22].
  5. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease: The Biology and Behavioral Basis for Smoking-Attributable Disease. A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2010 [accessed 2018 Mar 22].
  6. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Diabetes Public Health Resource: Prevent Diabetes [last updated 2012 May 14; accessed 2014 May 5].
  7. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Diabetes Public Health Resource: 2011 National Diabetes Fact Sheet [last updated 2011 May 20; accessed 2014 May 5].
Meet Bill

Bill had diabetes. He quit smoking the day his the 1 last update 10 Jul 2020 leg was amputated.Bill had diabetes. He quit smoking the day his leg was amputated.

“Having diabetes and the 1 last update 10 Jul 2020 being a smoker—my doctors always warned me about the bad things that could happen. Did I listen? No!”“Having diabetes and being a smoker—my doctors always warned me about the bad things that could happen. Did I listen? No!”

Page last reviewed: March 23, 2020
Content source: Office on Smoking and Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Social_govd govD Get Email Updates

To receive email updates about this page, enter your email address: