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🔥+ reverses diabetes type 2 06 Jul 2020 ... Type 1 and Type 2, diabetes mellitus in poor control." This condition is sometimes called Type 1.5 diabetes. What is the correct ICD-10-CM ...

reverses diabetes type 2 Type 2 diabetes can occur at any age but is most common in older adults. Read about the type 2 diabetes symptoms, risk factors, treatments, and more.

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Diabetes is a serious disease. In 2015, it was the 7th leading cause of death in the U.S. with over 79,000 deaths listed as the underlying cause of death and over 250,000 death certificates listed diabetes among the causes of death. According to the Diabetes Research Institute Foundation, Diabetes is increasing at an alarming rate in the U.S. and worldwide. In the U.S. alone there are over 30.3 million people (almost 9.5% of the population) who have been diagnosed with diabetes. It is estimated that an additional 7.2 million people have diabetes but have not yet been diagnosed. 

reverses diabetes type 2 lawsuit (👍 rice) | reverses diabetes type 2 qualify for fmlahow to reverses diabetes type 2 for Couple these numbers with the fact that the cost of insulin in the U.S. is exorbitant and in too many cases totally unaffordable by many of the most brittle insulin-dependent diabetics. Too many people are reducing their use or unable to purchase any insulin at all and trying to manage their disease without it. Both are completely unsafe practices. The cost of Diabetes has risen almost annually. In 2017, the overall cost was calculated by the Centers for Disease and Control (CDC) to exceed $327 billion. This calculates to about $17,000 per person each year, and that cost continues to rise.  

Nurses Need to Understand Diabetes

In order to teach daily diabetic care, it’s important to understand the disease and treatment. Last year over 40 million hospital days were incurred by patients with diabetes. Nurses need to know more about Diabetes. One way to learn more is through continuing education courses for nurses. There are two types of diabetes and much has been learned about the disease in last two decades.  Type I used to be known as insulin-dependent diabetes also known by the acronym IDDM, and Type II which was considered a late onset or adult diabetes with the acronym of NIDDM.  However, many Type II diabetics also require insulin due to an increasing resistance to or decreasing amount of the body’s own insulin and this term has been eliminated.  

These two theories have been replaced since the 1990’s with enhanced research findings including a multitude of causes for both types of Diabetes such as autoimmune responses, damage to the islet cells by other conditions or medications, genetic predisposition, genetic mutations that increase the risk for obesity, malfunction of the pancreas, liver, hormonal system and adipose tissue. These findings have made advances in care available and a possible cure or preventative courses are well-within the realm of possibilities over the next decade. 

What Does Insulin Do?

reverses diabetes type 2 jokes (☑ young) | reverses diabetes type 2 questionnairehow to reverses diabetes type 2 for The body requires insulin to regulate blood sugar thereby providing energy to tissues and cells throughout the body. Diabetes occurs when the body is no longer able to produce or effectively use its own insulin which is produced in the pancreas by islet cells. Type I diabetics require at least one injection of insulin each day either by individual injection or via an insulin pump in order to survive. Without insulin, the body would be unable to regulate blood sugar and consequently cells and tissues would be starved. They would become dehydrated and ultimately destroyed by the body. 

Diabetes is a progressive disease resulting in a multitude of complications. Type II diabetics can usually control blood glucose levels with diet, excess weight loss, and exercise. However, over time, oral anti-diabetic medications often become necessary and may include insulin. Over the course of time Type II diabetics may see their medication needs change. Strict adherence to diet and exercise are important factors in managing both types of diabetes. Changes in needs such as for pregnancy, stress and any chronic or acute illness can affect the actions of medications, diet and exercise on Diabetes and should be discussed with the endocrinologist.

Common-Sense Habits the 1 last update 06 Jul 2020 for Daily Diabetic CareCommon-Sense Habits for Daily Diabetic Care

Daily Diabetic care includes many common-sense habits. A general checklist of head-to-toe assessment should become second nature to the Diabetic patient, and caregivers and family should be acutely aware and observant of any changes. This includes keeping the body clean, dry and moisturized. Preventing skin irritation and infection is an the 1 last update 06 Jul 2020 essential aspect of good Diabetic care. Diabetics are often slow to heal and at risk for infection. Good oral hygiene is also essential. Brushing and flossing are important for Diabetics to prevent any infection. Foot care should include cleaning and drying well especially in between toes. The skin should be examined daily for irritation or cuts, blisters, circulation and sensation loss. Daily Diabetic care includes many common-sense habits. A general checklist of head-to-toe assessment should become second nature to the Diabetic patient, and caregivers and family should be acutely aware and observant of any changes. This includes keeping the body clean, dry and moisturized. Preventing skin irritation and infection is an essential aspect of good Diabetic care. Diabetics are often slow to heal and at risk for infection. Good oral hygiene is also essential. Brushing and flossing are important for Diabetics to prevent any infection. Foot care should include cleaning and drying well especially in between toes. The skin should be examined daily for irritation or cuts, blisters, circulation and sensation loss. 

Testing blood glucose levels should be performed as directed by the physician. At the minimum a Hemoglobin A1C should be drawn at least every 3-6 months on a well-controlled patient to monitor the averaged blood glucose levels in the body. This is usually a routine lab draw every 3-4 months on all Diabetics. It accompanies blood glucose levels from once daily fasting blood glucose levels to 4-6 times a day to observe for patterns of fasting, before meals and/or 2 hours post-prandial and at bedtime to establish a pattern of response to diet, medication and exercise. Keeping a log of the results is another habit to emphasize.

Sleep is an important factor for Diabetics and any issues with excessive nightmares or insomnia should be reported to the practitioner. Stress affects hormone levels and can play havoc with Diabetes. It should be managed and avoided whenever possible. 

Learning the Glycemic Index

Diet is one of the most important aspects of Diabetic care. The diet should be well balanced with all four food groups and portioned in moderation. Diabetics need to eat at regular intervals and take their medications as directed. Sugar occurs naturally in almost every food to some extent. Learning what foods are lower in sugar content takes effort and a commitment. The Glycemic Index is a good reference tool that every Diabetic should have handy. This guide ranks foods according to how they affect the blood glucose levels. Carbohydrates that are higher in fiber for example usually digest slower and are better metabolized, so they don’t turn straight to sugar and cause spikes in blood sugar. Apps are available for smart phones and pocket-sized books available for those who prefer. 

Learning to read labels is essential. It’s important to limit foods with a high naturally occurring sugar content as well as added sugars such as sucrose and high-fructose corn syrup. It’s also important to distinguish that “no sugar added” does not mean something is sugar free or necessarily fit for consumption by the Diabetic. Labels are required to indicate the amount of sugar measured in grams. For a healthy person without Diabetes, the American Heart Association recommends no more that 100 calories of added sugar a day for women and not more than 150 calories a day for men. In grams. that’s a maximum of 25 grams for women and 37.5 grams for men.  Look on any cereal box and most contain about 20 grams or more per serving. That’s almost the daily limit.  Choices need to be made. A diet diary is recommended for any new Diabetic, or someone experiencing poor control, to monitor the food intake and its effect on the blood glucose levels. 

Avoid Alcohol and Tobacco

Diabetics should limit or eliminate the consumption of alcohol because it too turns to sugar. Smoking is also an enemy of the Diabetic patient. The Diabetic patient should never attempt to adjust medications to allow for the consumption of excess sugars. Increasing exercise is a more effective way to reduce the effects of a small piece of birthday cake. 

All Diabetics must be seen regularly by a practitioner and should learn to report symptoms and parameters out of range for instruction in how to manage them. Complications such as neuropathy and circulation issues as well as kidney and heart disease are the most common issues. Managing blood glucose levels is the best-known way to help prevent complications. Taking medications as prescribed is essential. Don’t skip doses and if a dose is missed, don’t try to make it up. Watch for adverse symptoms (hyper or hypoglycemia) and take the next scheduled dose. 

Nurses are the backbone of the health care system. Diabetic teaching is a huge part of patient education with the rising instance and undiagnosed cases of Diabetes. Providing the best evidence-based care for patients requires staying up to date with trends in Diabetic care. 

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