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πŸ”₯+ reverses diabetes type 2 31 May 2020 Although diabetes cannot be cured, it can be treated successfully. If a high blood sugar level is brought down to a normal level, your symptoms ...Type 2 diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar level to become too high. It mainly occurs in people aged over 40.

reverses diabetes type 2 As of now, diabetes is classified as either Type I or Type II. New research suggests there are several more types of diabetes, which all require different treatment ...

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Clin Diabetes. 2014 Apr; 32(2): 76–77.
reverses diabetes type 2 abbreviation (⭐️ graph) | reverses diabetes type 2 high blood sugarhow to reverses diabetes type 2 for PMCID: PMC4485245
PMID: 26130865
Megan Walley, BS, is a medical student and Gerry Maitland, MD, is a professor of neurology at the Florida State University School of Medicine in Tallahassee. Elizabeth Anderson, MD, is a resident in internal medicine at Carolinas HealthCare System in Charlotte, N.C. Mary Walch Pippen, MD, is a resident in family medicine at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, N.C.
Copyright © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association.
This article has been cited by other articles in PMC.

In Brief

The authors studied patients with diabetes and complaints of dizziness to determine whether peripheral neuropathy or inner ear dysfunction was more likely to disturb balance. Quantitative testing showed that the majority failed to maintain balance in vestibular-related conditions and had normal equilibrium scores in conditions relying on somatosensory input. Vestibular dysfunction should be an immediate consideration in patients with diabetes and complaints of dizziness regardless of the presence of peripheral neuropathy.

The risk of falling is increased in people with diabetes who have peripheral neuropathy,1 and quantitative measurements of balance have demonstrated increased body sway compared to unaffected peers.25 Although differing in form of sensory input, the vestibular system is equally responsible for providing parallel spatially orienting information. Agrawal et al.6 studied a population of > 21,000 the 1 last update 31 May 2020 individuals and reported a prevalence rate for vestibular dysfunction of 35.4%; the odds increased with age and were 70% higher among people with diabetes. Morphological studies have suggested that microvascular and connective tissue changes, as well as alterations of inner ear fluid metabolism, may contribute to otolithic injury in people with diabetes.7,8 The purpose of this study was to determine whether peripheral neuropathy or vestibular dysfunction is more likely to disturb balance in patients with diabetes who have complaints of dizziness.The risk of falling is increased in people with diabetes who have peripheral neuropathy,1 and quantitative measurements of balance have demonstrated increased body sway compared to unaffected peers.25 Although differing in form of sensory input, the vestibular system is equally responsible for providing parallel spatially orienting information. Agrawal et al.6 studied a population of > 21,000 individuals and reported a prevalence rate for vestibular dysfunction of 35.4%; the odds increased with age and were 70% higher among people with diabetes. Morphological studies have suggested that microvascular and connective tissue changes, as well as alterations of inner ear fluid metabolism, may contribute to otolithic injury in people with diabetes.7,8 The purpose of this study was to determine whether peripheral neuropathy or vestibular dysfunction is more likely to disturb balance in patients with diabetes who have complaints of dizziness.

Design and Methods

reverses diabetes type 2 vbid (πŸ”΄ and insulin) | reverses diabetes type 2 treatment studieshow to reverses diabetes type 2 for Thirty-seven patients with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes who had complaints of dizziness, loss of balance, or falling and were referred to a specialized balance disorders clinic were examined to determine whether vestibular dysfunction, somatosensory dysfunction, or a combination of the two was most likely to contribute to postural disturbance. No subjects had examination evidence of orthostasis or neurological dysfunction other than known peripheral neuropathy. Visual acuities better than 20/40 were present in all patients. The study protocol was approved by the Florida State University institutional review board, and all patients provided written informed consent.

The patients were evaluated for polyneuropathy using a scoring system developed by Valk et al.9 Tested modalities included strength, deep tendon reflexes, proprioception, vibration, pain, and touch. Vestibular testing consisted of oculomotor examination, Romberg and sharpened Romberg tests, Hallpike’s maneuver, and Quix’s test.10 The relative contribution of somatosensory (proprioceptive) and vestibular systems to postural stability were quantitatively analyzed using a computer-linked platform system (EQUITEST Neurocom, Clackamas, Ore.) that examined sway and shear forces (i.e., center of gravity displacements). The system allows analysis of performance of visual, vestibular, and somatosensory systems individually and in varying combinations under both stable and destabilizing conditions. A balance score calculated as a percentage of body sway compared to maximal allowable sway of 12.5° is then assigned.

Results

Clinical examinations identified 1 subject with no sign of neuropathy, 21 with mild neuropathy, 12 with moderate neuropathy, and 3 with severe neuropathy. Twenty-six patients displayed clinical signs of vestibular dysfunction on one or more tests. Quantitative dynamic platform posturography (DPP) revealed 27 patients with overall substandard equilibrium scores. Of those 27, 25 individuals were substandard in vestibular-derived conditions with normal somatosensory scoring. Five patients were substandard in somatosensory conditions, and three of the five were also deficient in vestibular scores, indicating a multisystem stability disorder.

Discussion

This for 1 last update 31 May 2020 investigation reconfirms that vestibular deficiency is present in a high percentage of people with diabetes. Furthermore, this study suggests that vestibular deficiency contributes significantly more to quantitatively demonstrable disequilibrium than does proprioceptive loss resulting from peripheral nerve injury.This investigation reconfirms that vestibular deficiency is present in a high percentage of people with diabetes. Furthermore, this study suggests that vestibular deficiency contributes significantly more to quantitatively demonstrable disequilibrium than does proprioceptive loss resulting from peripheral nerve injury.

Clinical vestibular tests identify dysfunction in a significant percentage of patients with diabetes. It seems plausible that, despite the presence of peripheral neuropathy, balance remains stable because of compensatory parallel sensory input—visual and vestibular—and fails when inner ear dysfunction develops.

These results are significant because, while there are presently few therapeutic interventions for proprioceptive loss, there are a number of well-conceived studies documenting success in vestibular rehabilitation.11,12 These studies emphasize the higher identification rates of vestibular dysfunction in conditions such as benign positional vertigo and note the availability of both central nervous system and vestibular plasticity. Successful rehabilitation strategies include repositioning maneuvers, retraining in motor strategies, emphasis on use of other sensory inputs, reduction of sensory conflict, adjustment of the gain of the vestibular ocular reflex, adaption to low-contrast sensitivity, and parsing of cognitive allocation.13,14

reverses diabetes type 2 term (⭐️ risk factors) | reverses diabetes type 2 obesityhow to reverses diabetes type 2 for Thus, vestibular dysfunction should be an immediate consideration in people with diabetes who have dizziness complaints regardless of the presence of peripheral neuropathy, and rehabilitation strategies should be considered for those identified as having this dysfunction.

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